Charles Benayon

Founder & CEO of Aspiria


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Why Laughing at Work is a Good Thing

coworkers-laughing-in-office-horiz

How many times have you written or read a job description that includes a sense of humour in the job skill requirements? I see it quite often and it makes perfect sense. In fact 96% of the executives surveyed by Accountemps believed that people with a sense of humour do better at their jobs than those who have little or no sense of humour and 89% of CEOs believe all things being equal, they’d rather hire someone with a good sense of humour. Humour in the workplace can provide many benefits to your company.

 

What can humour do for your company?

I believe that humour in the workplace is quite often misunderstood. I’m not suggesting that you launch into a comedic stand-up routine at the start of your next meeting or encourage your staff to play practical jokes on each other; but giving your employees permission to relax and laugh can go a long way. Humour in the workplace can:

  • Attract employees
  • Improve employee retention
  • Reduce employee churn rates
  • Improve employee morale
  • Reduce stress and boredom
  • Boost engagement and well-being
  • Reduce employee absenteeism
  • Improve creativity and collaboration
  • Improve productivity

How you can add humour in your workplace

  • Call a meeting specifically to discuss adding humour to your workplace and let everyone brainstorm ways to do it. After the group has come up with some great ideas, add the best ones to the calendar on a monthly or quarterly basis. It’ll be great for morale to have fun things to look forward to.
  • Create a humour committee who will pursue initiatives that add humour to your workplace. Many companies already have social committees that plan events or team sports like baseball leagues so why not a humour committee?
  • At team meetings have everyone bring in an industry related comic or funny story to share. Vote on the best one and then post it in the lunch room.
  • At team meetings, have a spontaneous brainstorm session. Invite staff to be creative, think outside box, and come up with a “crazy funny” idea for the company. You never know, there could be a new line of revenue waiting to be hatched for your business!
  • Have fun coming up with conference/meeting room names. At Facebook, employees vote on the name of the conference room in their designated area.
  • Give your staff permission to be spontaneous and have fun at work. As numerous studies have shown employees that have fun at work are happier and more productive.

Business sometimes is too serious. Happy employees are productive employees and that’s good business. Do you have a culture of “humour” at your workplace? What changes can you make to add more humour to your workplace?


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Staying Motivated During Uncertain Times

Aspiria-Motivation (1)Have you noticed how the news channels only seem to show tragedies around the world? I remember when an unexpected event would make headlines, and we were shocked by how horrific the situation was, and how many lives were taken. Today’s news headlines seem to be filled with airport bombings, gun massacres, immigrants fleeing en masse for their safety on lifeboats, uncontrollable forest fires, planes disappearing off radars, and stabbings in our neighbourhoods. The reports from all media are continuous, 24/7, and we are supposed to process the devastation and get on with our daily lives without interruption to our psyche?

As employers, you may have employees who are feeling the effects of all this chaos trickling down and affecting their ability to function at work at their best. You may observe this as more frequent sick days, employees arriving late or leaving early, and not asking for or taking more vacation time. Others may decline attending office parties, staff lunches, and other events or meetings with coworkers; difficulty dealing with problems, setting and meeting deadlines, maintaining personal relationships, managing staff, participating in meetings, and making presentations.

Depending on the individual employee, they can start to develop Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD). These individuals may not feel that they are actively worrying, but this exaggerated fear can cause constant stress, and can stop them from living life fully.

Some signs of GAD can include:

  • Excessive, ongoing worry and tension
  • An unrealistic view of problems
  • Restlessness or a feeling of being “edgy”
  • Irritability
  • Muscle tension
  • Headaches
  • Difficulty concentrating, and easily distracted from daily chores
  • Tiredness
  • Trouble falling or staying asleep
  • Being easily startled

How can you help? Be diligent in providing reassurance about their performance. As an employer, you can support your staff by encouraging an open-door philosophy to have a conversation about how they are doing and where they can find help. Show your support through posters in the lunchroom or through intranet communications, promoting self-help assistance or external resources such as the EAP.

Recognizing feeling of fear in ourselves and those around us, and supporting each other in unsure times, will help to motivate, rather than paralyze, creating a path to living life to its fullest.