Charles Benayon

Founder & CEO of Aspiria


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Is Social Media Affecting Your Mental Health?

media-998990_640For work or play, social media has become a strong part of our lives, and it is here to stay. Social media allows us to be continuously connected with family, friends and the pulse of business, even while we are busy doing other things! Social media helps us find jobs, events, lets us know what our friends and families are up to, and it links us to news that is happening not only in our community, but literally around the world. Despite social media policies and your organization’s attempts to manage your employees’ use of social media at work, constantly checking in with social media on a regular basis has become the norm in most offices, instead of the exception.

Allowing your employees to access their social sites results in happier employees, which in turn results in increased productivity and retention – but it can also result in anxiety, depression, and overall poor mental health.

Studies have found that Facebook and other social media platforms can negatively affect a user’s mental health. Facebook’s former vice-president for user growth has stated that the platform is slowly destroying how society works by creating short-term dopamine (reward-motivated behaviours). One study discovered that technology is not only addictive, but it can have mental health consequences such as depression, stress and sleep disorder.

Whether they are using it for fun or for business, it is your responsibility to inform your employees that too much social media can have a negative impact on their mental health. So how do we support an employee’s need to interact with social media without jeopardizing their productivity? Below I’ve outlined a few tips to help you help your employees better navigate social media at work and beyond.

Unplug. Researchers have found that unplugging from social media gives your brain the time it needs to recharge before starting a new day. Create a team or individual challenge for your employees by asking them to unplug for a morning, a workday, or 24 hours. You can then regroup with your team and elicit feedback as to the changes they noticed in themselves while being unplugged. If your staff generally comments about not sleeping well, feeling depressed, or just stressed out, give them this challenge to try and see how much better they feel.

Limit usage time. Like distracted driving, engaging in social media throughout the day can also be a distraction from focussing on work. While it is difficult to “police” employees’ connectedness with their personal social media, you can suggest reducing social connection time to breaks and lunch hours only. In fact, inviting staff to use their social media at work judiciously may lead to better trust, honesty, and general happiness among staff, resulting in better mental health.

Personal Connection. Encourage more face-to-face time for your staff. This is not a meeting; rather, it could be a luncheon, a learning session or potluck. These are great ways to build team connections, collaboration, sharing and positively increase the mental health of your team. You can also encourage staff to interact with posts about team promotions beyond a simple “like”. Send them a private message or leave a comment on the post, as being an active user can better your mental health.

While social media is absolutely a powerful tool, like everything else in life, technology should be used in moderation to prevent it from creating or exacerbating mental health problems.

I hope these tips will help guide you on a new path to better mental health for your employees Remember, interacting on social media, limiting time on the platforms, and focusing on encouraging personal connections will positively affect your mental health. What have you done to limit social media time in your workplace?

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Mental Health Coping Strategies You Can Try Today!

office exercise

If you cope with mental health issues in your life, you might be familiar with experiencing a stressful, anxiety-inducing or depressing episode during the workday. This episode can be compounded by discomfort because you may not want to show that you are upset while at work. With 1 in 5 Canadians suffering from some kind of mental health issue, it becomes vital for us to develop and hone coping strategies and skills that allow us to support ourselves through difficult moments if formal support is not available.

We all know that learning to manage stress and mental health is a life-long journey, but how can you help yourself when you experience an episode in the workplace?  The following are tangible strategies that can help you maintain a sense of calm and control of your mental health while at work.

Talk (or Write) it Out: If it is appropriate, talk with a trusted family member, colleague or friend about what you are currently experiencing. Releasing some of the pent-up anxiety or bad feelings brings relief to the immediate symptoms that can keep us from being productive. If you are not comfortable speaking to someone or prefer to write out your feelings, take a few minutes to do so. Take note of potential triggers, exactly what you’re feeling and how long the experience lasts. This can help you uncover patterns and predict stressful situations.

Accomplish something: If you are feeling overwhelmed with the amount of things on your plate, it may help you to accomplish something – even if it is unrelated or minor. For example, if you are worried about completing all the items on a task list for a big project, it may help you to clear your email inbox or complete a timeline of how you plan to tackle the work. Ensure that you channel this feeling of accomplishment and capability into your task list.

Endorphins are your friend: We are all aware of the health benefits of exercise. Even a short, 10 minute walk can do wonders in terms of clearing your head, getting some fresh air and pumping feel-good hormones into your bloodstream.

Coaching Up: Coaching up refers to the process of offering suggestions to your manager or boss about ways in which he or she can support you in the workplace. Sharing only as much as you feel comfortable, tell your manager how you prefer to receive instruction, how you respond to stressful situations, and what times of day you are most productive. This opens the lines of communication between you and your manager so that the work environment is a safer place for you even when you are experiencing a mental health issue.

Be kind to yourself: We are often our own harshest critics and when we become stressed, overwhelmed or down, we forget to be kind to ourselves! Be a friend to yourself and think of what advice or support you would give a dear friend if they came to you with the same feelings or worries that you are currently experiencing. As a friend, you would be understanding and highlight your friend’s strengths and positive qualities. Remember to be this kind of friend to yourself!

Anxiety, worry and even bouts of depression can be found at home and at work, and it is unrealistic to expect us to purge ourselves completely from these feelings or episodes of poor mental health. What we can do is improve the way we manage our symptoms and find ways to support ourselves through a difficult time. What do you do to get yourself through a stressful situation? Would you feel comfortable using any of the coping strategies listed above? I look forward to your thoughts below.