Charles Benayon

Founder & CEO of Aspiria


Leave a comment

Positively Productive

think-positiveAs we begin a new year, there is a sense of hope instilled in all of us. There are countless opportunities ahead, and a fresh beginning can inspire us in all aspects of our life. A lot of people make resolutions, and after a tumultuous year, I have as well: to be positive.

Positivity is a state of mind. It encompasses all elements of our life. So how can we be more positive, not only in our personal lives but at work as well? More specifically, as managers, how can we encourage this attitude amongst our employees when things get tough at work? Studies show that positive employees are more productive and exhibit more signs of motivation. So if you are looking to boost morale in your workplace this year, here’s a list of ways you can incorporate more positivity into your organization:

Be Social

In the workplace, we are often so busy working on projects and tasks that we forget to interact and be friendly with our employees and co-workers. The need to socialize started as an evolutionary method of survival. Not much has changed today; a study by UCLA researchers outlines the health benefits of social interaction, stating that social contact with others has a greater impact on overall health than cholesterol levels do.

So how can you create more of a social community in your workplace? While I am not suggesting creating a “party” atmosphere amongst your workforce, a simple “hello” to employees from higher-ranking staff each day, organized social events within the company, and encouraging employees to socialize and get to know one another are actions, among others, that can significantly boost morale in the workplace, and therefore increase job satisfaction and productivity.

Change your schedule

Most office employees work between the hours of 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. each day. While this may be the overall average workday, it doesn’t always work for each employee. For example, a single mother may need to drop her children off at daycare by 6 a.m. and pick them up by 4 p.m. at the latest. The daily struggle to find the time to manage both her job and parental duties could create a large amount of stress.

While it’s not always possible, try to work around your employee’s personal schedules. Maybe they would prefer to come in earlier and leave earlier or start later and leave later As long as you are satisfied with the work being done, making these changes can increase employee’s job satisfaction while reducing stress levels. Additionally, according to an article in the Journal of Applied Psychology, workers who can produce their own schedules are more efficient and less likely to call in sick than employees who work a strict schedule.

Allow employees to control their space

A 2013 Workplace Study by design and architectural firm Gensler found that employees who had control over their own workspace were not only more satisfied in their roles, they had higher motivation and productivity rates.

For example, their study reported that tech firms had a higher happiness rate in an open-concept office space. Facebook, in particular, has found success this way by allowing their employees to customize their workplace layout based on the project at hand. By allowing employees creative control of their workspace, studies show an increase in organizational productivity.

While a major change in workspaces may not be possible for all employers, talk to your employees about their workspace needs and evaluate how you can make this work for them. If they require focus and attention to detail, a walled cubicle may make sense. If they need to interact with employees more frequently, an open-concept plan would be more efficient.

At the end of the day, we spend a majority of our lives at work. If we want to make sure our employees continue to perform well, have high levels of job satisfaction and are motivated, it’s our responsibility to create a positive and enjoyable workplace environment year round.

What other ways can you think of to improve the positivity of your workforce?

Advertisements


Leave a comment

Body Language in the Workplace – Does it Really Make a Difference?

Screen Shot 2016-04-19 at 8.48.33 AM.pngSometimes, it’s what you don’t say that speaks volumes.

When it comes to communicating with employees, body language can convey both positive and negative messages, often unbeknownst to you. In your role as leader within your workplace, it is possible to create and nurture a positive work environment by being aware of simple ways your body language can be effectively used.

I would like to share with you some ways that you could start immediately in developing a workspace that encourages positivity and teamwork:

  1. Valuing Input

You may have an open-door policy in place, but when an employee comes to you to share their ideas and issues, how you position yourself when listening to them can express that their input is welcomed. When seated, ensure that your arms are at your sides or on your desk and not crossed, and facing them with maintained eye contact. It is about maintaining an “open” stance to show an open mind to hearing what they have to say. When an employee feels valued, loyalty increases.

  1. Mirroring

As employers, we want our employees to feel connected and engaged in their work. Mirroring another’s body language is a powerful way you can create a bond and show acceptance. By “copying” their posture, facial expressions, seating position, gestures, or tone of voice, you are building an unconscious rapport that makes the other person feel “liked”. The key is to not immediately do the same gesture but rather, wait a minute or two, so the movement or expression is delayed and has the intended “subconscious” effect, without mocking. Feeling a sense of belonging can elevate their motivation, and mirroring can help to create this feeling.

  1. Initial Impressions

When meeting a new employee, offering a firm handshake and a warm smile can make a great first impression. Doing so can help create a relaxed atmosphere for those who are nervous, as well as speaking at a moderate pace. Speaking at a speed that is faster than the other person can enhance a feeling of pressure, and a relaxed tone and pace can help to alleviate any tension or awkwardness and give a good impression of the company at this early stage.

  1. Pay Attention to Signs

Happy and healthy employees can reduce turnover, and so it is important for you to ensure the well-being of your staff. Although certain physical gestures and expressions can indicate underlying conditions, be aware of how employees are sitting (leaning back in their chair or slumped over), avoiding eye contact, keeping their cellphone up as a “wall” between another person during a conversation, eye-rolling, are just some possible indications of unhappiness in the workplace. It is important to be mindful of whether staff consists of millennials or baby-boomers, as generational differences may affect how their body language expresses their feelings. Being able to recognize the signs is important to ensure that the proper supports are in place, such as an EAP, to increase employee satisfaction and dedication.

By becoming aware of the ways thoughts and feelings can be non-verbally expressed, you will be able to encourage a supportive and positive work environment.

How do you use body language when communicating with employees? Are there any ways you could improve your body language? Would you be able to recognize differences in your employees’ body language?

 

 


1 Comment

Using Emotions to Your Advantage During Organizational Change

time for change It is a generally accepted notion that in today’s world, organizational change is a constant and necessary part of growing and evolving your  business. Yet, employees often feel that when change occurs in their organization, they were either not expecting the change or worse, if  they were expecting it, they were not prepared for it.

 Organizational leaders can manage the process of organizational change more effectively for the employee and the organization if it pays  attention to the emotional component of change.  In general, when facilitating organizational change, leaders often act as if data and facts  are the only metrics that matter.  When the emotional piece of the puzzle is missing, ignored or denied, organizations aren’t very good at  creating effective organizational change.
When a leader recognizes, values and manages the emotions related to change, this trend can be  reversed. Imagine being able to help your employees prepare for and even embrace change, achieving better results from your efforts to validate the emotions associated with change.

I’d like to share with you my top five positive emotion suggestions to help your organization create more effective change, better relationships and less stress:

Joy. Help your employees see the big picture of the change – the purpose for it.  When they see, understand and believe in the “big why” for the change, joy can truly become a shared emotion.

Gratitude. Often times in the short term, changes look catastrophic and chaotic, but when viewed later with the perspective of time, the change was a positive. Get your employees thinking about how things will improve in the long run to encourage a sense of gratitude.

Serenity. Serenity results when  employees are able to accept change and take ownership over their  part in the transformation. Instead of focusing on what is outside of their control, help your employees see where they can  make a difference.

Interest. While the status quo is a powerful thing, when we discover something new, we feel a sense of possibility. Help your employees get interested in some component or outcome of the change, and see this interest develop into creativity and innovation for your business.

Hope. We have all been through times of transition and probably felt frustration in the midst of an organizational change, yet hope is the belief that things can, and will, improve. Help your employees see past today and recognize their part in making tomorrow better, and engage their innate hopefulness.

What other emotions are associated with organizational change? How have you seen your employees respond to change? I look forward to hearing your thoughts in the comments below!