Charles Benayon

Founder & CEO of Aspiria


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Good Grades vs. Social Life – You Can Have Both!

image-from-rawpixel-id-401332-jpegDo you ever feel like you’re performing a juggling act, trying to meet all of your needs and wants at the same time? With work, school, friends, and family, just one more time commitment thrown into the mix might make it all come crashing down.

I’ve seen firsthand just how busy and chaotic the lives of students can be, resulting in inner turmoil and loneliness. And I understand that it may sometimes feel like you have no choice but to let either your grades slip or social life dwindle, especially in 1st year when everything you experience is new! However, there are some ways you can keep both:

Organize Study Groups

Whether you’re taking online or in-person courses, there are many options to host or attend effective study groups. Most libraries allow students to book private rooms, or you can meet at somebody’s house or a common area on campus. For online study groups, consider creating a Facebook group that’s only accessible to people that are invited. Study groups are great opportunities to focus on course material and provide opportunities for socializing for the following reasons:

  • Never Miss a Class. In case you ever need to miss a class due to illness or personal reasons, your study group will always be available to share their notes with you.
    • Pro Tip: Consider enrolling in a course with a friend! Most, if not all, post-secondary programs require a certain number of elective courses. So even if you and your friend are enrolled in different programs, you can still spend quality time with them in the classroom or lecture hall.
  • Mingle Afterwards. Once the group has covered the relevant material for the week, why not suggest that you all hang out afterwards for a meal, movie, or board game? This approach will allow you to effectively use your time for both school and pleasure!

Join Program-Specific Clubs

Most post-secondary schools have dozens or even hundreds of clubs or other extra-curriculars you can join. Some might be purely for fun, and others might be more applicable to your studies. If you don’t find a club that interests you, start your own! These are great ways to feel like a part of the school community while also improving your academics for the following reasons:

  • Build Your Resume. If you join a student organization or club that has elected positions, such as president or treasurer, holding such titles can look impressive to some employers. Even just being a regular member shows that you have passion.
  • Explore Off Campus. Many clubs organize field trips or social gatherings outside of their regularly scheduled meetings on campus. These might fulfill your social needs more than study groups.

Set a Schedule

For non-campus activities like going to the movies, out to dinner, or out on the town with friends, you may want to create an online calendar you can access from your computer and phone. Outlook and Google Calendar are just a few options available. This way you can always keep track of your responsibilities and time commitments, including projects, study times, club meetings, and social gatherings. Glancing at your calendar is also a quick and easy way to ensure you don’t overcommit and overwhelm yourself.

You can also free up more time throughout the school year by taking a couple of courses during the summer. If your typical course load during the spring and fall is five courses each, you can decrease it to four by taking two summer courses. Schools that offer summer classes allow you the option to spread out and dilute the stress – and increase the enjoyment – of your program.

If you need a little extra help finding a balance between your social life and academics and learning how you can incorporate both into your everyday routine, contact your Student Assistance Program provider.

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Getting the Most Out of Your Employee & Student Assistance Programs: A 4-Part Series

adult-american-black-and-white-935870As the founder of Employee Assistance Program (EAP) and Student Assistance Program (SAP) services, I am often surprised to learn that when people hear the words “EAP” and “SAP” the first thing they typically think of is psychological counselling services. You may be surprised to know that there is so much more that these services have to offer.

In fact, it is so important that you understand all the services that are available to you through your EAP or SAP services that I have decided to dedicate a quarterly blog series outlining what we at Aspiria call specialized solutions – additional services that are available through EAPs and SAPs.

To get us started, I have highlighted a few EAP services that greatly improve work environments by benefitting employees and their family:

 

Elder and Child Care

Taking care of a loved one, whether they are an aging parent or a newborn child, can sometimes feel like a full-time job, and unconditional love doesn’t always make the job any easier. What employers can do to make their employees’ home life easier is offer elder and child care services through their EAP.

Elder care speaks to caregivers, seniors, and everyone who is proactively planning for their future. Our EAPs offer information about Canadian systems available to the elderly as well as the essentials regarding housing options. We also educate employees on common physical and mental changes that often develop with age and what they can do to minimize these changes.

For younger employees that are considering starting a family or have already begun that chapter of their lives, Aspiria’s EAPs offer many services related to child care. Here are just a few family-oriented services we can provide through an EAP at no expense to parents:

  • Parenting provides information to parents of all different experience levels with kids of all different ages. This information can be anything parenting-related, from raising your child’s self-esteem to keeping backseat chaos to a minimum.
  • Adoption helps employees throughout the entire adoption process, including the legal and financial aspects, special parenting needs of adopted children, and information on how to find their child’s birth parents.
  • Kids’ Well-Being offers tips to keep children safe and sound from infancy through to young adulthood, with an emphasis on health, safety, and a positive interaction with the world around them.

To ensure your employees find a better work-life balance, direct them to their EAP, which will encourage them to live a healthy, happy life well into old age and help them reduce stresses that come from taking care of an aging family member or raising children.

 

OnCallogic

Studies have found that 40% of people diagnosed with cancer experience symptoms of psychological distress. This is why many EAPs provide organizations with much-needed mental health support for employees affected by cancer, but Aspiria goes even further. We partnered with Gilda’s Club – a leader in an international network of cancer support organizations that has over 20,000 interactions per year with individuals living with cancer – to develop our OnCallogic service.

OnCallogic includes a series of counselling sessions with Cancer Coaching Specialists for employees who have been touched by cancer, whether directly (they have cancer) or indirectly (a loved one has cancer), to ensure that no one has to face a cancer diagnosis alone. The OnCallogic mission is to ensure that all people impacted by cancer are empowered by knowledge, strengthened by action, and sustained by community and professional support.

It is estimated that nearly 1 in 2 Canadians will be diagnosed with cancer at some point in their life. With the disease being so commonplace in today’s workplace, it has become all the more essential to offer employees expert cancer support services. Not only will OnCallogic ease their difficult circumstances, but it also helps guide them towards living with cancer, whatever the outcome.

 

WorkLife Web Portal

Of today’s youth, the employees of tomorrow, 68% say they would use the Internet to search for mental health information if they needed to, making online access to resources more important than ever. It is for this reason that Aspiria connects employees to the work-life balance information they need at the click of a button and allows them to communicate with Work-Life Consultants 24/7 over instant messaging.

Our WorkLife Web Portal, accessible through the Aspiria website, provides access to the following seven life modules:

  • Aging
  • Balancing
  • Living
  • Working
  • Thriving
  • Parenting
  • International

 

Each of these modules offer “digital kits” on a large number of topics that employees and their family members can relate to, no matter what stage of life they’re in. These kits include informative articles, assessments, and audio files.

By offering an EAP that includes online accessibility to important tools and resources, you allow your employees more ease than ever before to achieve a proper work-life balance.

For more details on these work-life services and everything else your EAP has to offer, contact your provider today. And keep an eye out for our next instalment of Getting More Out of Your Assistance Program next quarter!


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Suicide in the Media: Making Your Feelings Your Own

woman-1006100_1280As you may have heard, the world has lost two iconic celebrities to suicide in the past two weeks: Kate Spade and Anthony Bourdain. Although an average of 11 suicides are committed every day in Canada, we tend to pay more attention to the subject when the media covers celebrity deaths.

With news stories reporting more and more information about celebrities, their families, and the state of their mental health, you may find yourself comparing your life and state of mind to theirs. Since the suicide rate increased by 10% in the United States shortly after Robin Williams took his life, how can we prevent the same from happening after every celebrity suicide?

We sometimes find it difficult to understand why celebrities, who seem to have the world as their oyster, would commit suicide. If we are having difficulties with work, money, or love, and it seems that celebrities have everything going for them, why is their life less worth living than ours?

At the risk of sounding cliché, money may make things easier, but it does not buy happiness. Regardless of one’s financial or social status, experiencing difficulties with mental health has no boundaries. Celebrities face several roadblocks on the path to happiness, just as we might. No matter how many news stories are posted, detailing facts (or rumours) about a person of interest, we can never truly know a celebrity’s complete story. Their experiences and difficulties are their own; just because they are famous doesn’t mean their problems are any more or less important than yours or mine.

One recommendation I have to cope with the influx of celebrity suicide coverage in the media is to avoid applying “should” to your feelings or those of other people. For example, “I should be miserable because my life is worse than Anthony Bourdain’s.” There is no “should” when it comes to emotions. You feel the way that you feel, and there is a reason for it. Whether or not you know or understand that reasoning, your feelings are just as valid as anybody else’s.

If recent events have helped you recognize that you have difficulties managing your mental health, I ask you to seek help. If you are unsure where your mental health stands, let the passing of Kate Spade and Anthony Bourdain be your push to talk to someone. Check in with your 24/7 Employee or Student Assistance Program, reach out to a friend or a family member, or call one of many available 24-hour suicide hotlines.

And please don’t forget to follow up with your loved ones who may be affected by sensationalized media coverage of celebrity suicides. Learn to recognize the signs and symptoms of depression, and let your friends, family, and coworkers know that no one is alone.


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Exam Season: 3 Tips to Lower Your Body’s Stress Level

k-67-dsc045553442545-fon_1-id-68958-jpegAs I’m sure you’re all aware, exam season has commenced. I know from experience that in times of high stress and when exam dates loom, it’s tempting to forgo sleep and easy to forget to eat or hydrate. These are very unhealthy means of studying, and they only add to your stress.

To avoid high stress levels or illness this exam season, I would like to provide you with three tips to take care of your body and reduce your stress level when preparing for exams:

  1. Eat and Drink
    It’s one thing to eat and drink healthily on a regular basis, but during exam season, some students remain so focused on their studies that they forget to eat or drink something at all! Understandably, your focus is your studies, but I implore you to stay hydrated and fed.

    During periods of high stress, I sometimes set hourly alarms on my phone to remind myself to drink water. This may seem silly, but it’s easy to get lost in your head, especially while studying, and ignore what your body needs.

    As for what you eat, it may seem like you don’t have time to cook. You probably don’t want to spend hundreds of dollars on take out over the next couple weeks, but you need to eat something. Before exam season is in full swing, pick up a few key items at the grocery store for simple meals, like cereal, salad, and sandwiches. Be sure you are incorporating some nutritious foods such as vegetables and protein. And always keep snacks in your bag, like apples or granola bars, in case you accidently skip a meal.

  2. Exercise
    I’m sure you’ve heard that exercise releases delightful hormones called endorphins, which trigger positive feelings to reduce stress and pain. Luckily, a simple 10-minute walk could be enough to produce several hours of stress relief.

    If you’re an extrovert and hours of secluded studying is worsening your stress, attend a group exercise lesson at your campus or preferred gym. Not only will you be getting exercise, but you’ll also benefit from the additional aspect of socialization, giving you a much-needed break between study sessions.

  3. Rest
    This might be the most difficult tip to follow, since it’s sort of a catch-22. Six to eight hours for a good night’s rest is a lot of time, but the longer you go without sleep in order to study the less you are likely to retain the information. Research shows that recalling information from one day to the next is easier after a night of sleep. However difficult it may be to rationalize, it is important to find a balance between study time and sleep time. You don’t want all of your efforts to be wasted by falling asleep during an exam.

It’s important to remember that you’re not alone in this; all of your fellow students are going through the exact same crazy time. Reach out to your friends and help each other stay sane and healthy during this and future exam seasons. If you require more structured support, reach out to a school counsellor or your Student Assistance Program to assist you with a study plan or exam accommodations. Good luck!


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Future Leaders Deserve Greater Access to Mental Health Resources

Helping HandThis month, a student from Guelph University in Ontario, live-streamed his attempted suicide on the Internet to a chat room of viewers. The student was rescued by emergency services and survived his injuries, however, this episode raises extremely concerning questions about the apparent hopelessness and desperation that is leading young people to believe suicide is their only option.

Since no two suicidal circumstances are the same, the reasons for someone reaching this unfortunate conclusion vary from person to person. The university and college demographic share some overarching qualities that could contribute to a pattern of poor coping skills in this age group, including but not limited to:

  • Family and self-imposed academic expectations are unrealistically high
  • Difficult transition from living at home to living on their own
  • Inability to cope with exam pressure
  • Financial debt and student loans
  • Career and future economic success not guaranteed

While the reasons surrounding this Guelph student’s attempt are not publicly known, this case speaks to a much larger issue facing young Canadians, and the statistics in recent years are quite alarming:

  • Worldwide, youth suicides has tripled since 1950 for the 15-24 age group
  • In Canada, suicide is the 2nd highest cause of death for youth ages 19-24
  • In Canada, 300 youths die every year by suicide
  •  For every successful suicide, there are 400 attempts
  • New research shows that students are more likely to have suicidal ideation if they went to school with someone who died by suicide
  • Eight out of ten youth who attempt or die by suicide hint of their plans beforehand, often to a friend.*

This last statistic is a call to action for many of the resources available on campuses – If someone is able to pick up on a suicidal person’s cues and  learn of their intentions, there is a chance the suicide could be prevented, especially if professional help is quickly accessible. Most universities and colleges are equipped with Student Health Services, Professional Counsellors, Peer Networks, Student Support Associations and Community Resources.

These services offer quality assistance to those in need and have helped countless students overcome their personal obstacles, but the question remains: are they enough? Unfortunately, most of these services are only available during the school year and during working hours, which leaves students with limited options after hours, on weekends and during the summer months. The wait for students to see counsellors has increased, on average, to three-weeks and with campus resources working at their maximum capacity already, the demand for service is not being met sufficiently with existing internal resources.

What can you do to better meet the needs of your students? A Student Assistance Program is an opportunity to fill any gaps in the current internal student support systems by offering increased accessibility to a breadth of expert mental health services. Offering a preventative Student Assistance Program can provide students with access to psychological counselling before a full-blown crisis occurs.  A Student Assistance Program can also provide auxiliary services for legal, financial, nutrition, and lifestyle issues which can help mitigate the deleterious impact on the psychological well being of the student. Success in this endeavour has been demonstrated with collaboration between internal campus resources and external professional services by offering mental health resources that complement and augment existing internal resources. Implementing a fiscally responsible Student Assistance Program gives the gift of choice to your students, allowing them to take advantage of both campus and external mental health services around the clock. University and College stakeholders can rest easier knowing they are providing students more comprehensive care.

Don’t our future leaders deserve greater access, choice and expertise to support them through their mental health journey?

Have you implemented an SAP into your institution to complement services that already exist? What benefits have you seen with an SAP? I look forward to your thoughts below!

(* Statistics courtesy of Stats Canada, Canadian Mental Health Association and Canadian Medical Association Journal)