Charles Benayon

Founder & CEO of Aspiria


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Furthering The Inclusivity Of Women In The Workplace

men-1979261_1920Gender inclusivity has been a huge topic of conversation, especially in regards to the workplace. We’ve come a long way over the past few years, yet despite all of the work that our society has accomplished in creating a more inclusive work environment, women still face challenges in finding equal opportunity and promotion in the workplace, especially when seeking advancement.

In many cases, I’ve seen women who are not only seeking equal opportunity – they are also seeking equal treatment. Studies have shown that despite the increased awareness to the treatment of women in the workplace, many women still experience sexism, sexual harassment, and less opportunity to take on leadership roles within their organization.

Here’s how these factors have had an impact on the workplace, and what your organization can do to improve mental health, safety, and wellbeing for women within the work environment.

Sexism and harassment

Approximately 23% of women between the ages of 16 to 30 have said that they’ve experienced discriminatory actions, such as sexism and harassment, in their work environment. What happens to an employee’s mental health when they feel as though they are being discriminated against or harassed because of their gender? Employee dissatisfaction, anxiety, and depression are often the results.

These challenges paint a truly disheartening picture for women seeking leadership opportunities, and it goes to show that employers must be vigilant as to what happens within their organization. I always advise HR professionals to maintain an open door policy with any and all team members so that they may feel comfortable reporting harassment or discrimination, if it occurs. This is a big step towards having a safer work environment.

The lack of equal opportunity

It makes sense that if you put in the hard work and effort, you should be able to reap the benefits. Unfortunately, women are less likely to receive a promotion, often for the same C-Suite positions as their male peers. For women of colour, promotion is even less likely, despite them being 16% more interested in Executive positions. Additionally, women who have families are often passed up entirely for potential leadership roles.

So, what’s the solution? A diversity policy founded on providing equal opportunity to employees (e.g. having the same amount of women as men promoted to more prominent positions) is one of the best recommendations I can make for an organization looking to create a more inclusive space. You may find that having more women in c-level positions offers unique perspectives and methods of business execution that may not have occurred in your organization before.

In addition to this, most are now required to offer parental leave to parents of either gender after the birth of a child. This ensures that both men and women are considered equally valuable to the organization, in conjunction with contributing to their own family dynamic.

Equal pay for equal work

In Canada, women still only make 74 cents for each dollar that their male counterparts make. This is a staggering difference, and it’s something that has been brought to the attention of several organizations. The wage gap has partially occurred as a result of more paying positions being available to women since the inclusion of women in the workforce in the 1950s. However, the current wage gap is likely part in par to gender discrimination.

All employees deserve to be paid equally for equal work. Your employees’ health and happiness are vital to your organization’s success, and it is crucial to remain aware of your employees’ needs and goals, especially when it comes to their mental health.

With your help, your organization can ensure that the workplace is a safe and inclusive space where equal opportunity and resources are provided, not just for your organization’s success, but also for the peace of mind of your employees. If you need more assistance in improving the health and wellness of your organization, or in creating new initiatives for the wellness of your staff, contact your Employee Assistance Program today.

 

 

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Women and Wellness in the Workplace

This past March 8th was National Women’s Day. It was a day to celebrate the social, economic, cultural, and political achievements of women all around the world. Although it was only one short day, I think it’s great that we are taking the time to acknowledge all the wonderful things that women have accomplished.

One accomplishment that stands out to me is the growing number of women in the workplace. It’s fantastic that in 2014, women made up almost half of the labour force compared to just 37% in 1976.

While it augurs well that more and more companies are hiring female employees, it does bring with it a new set of mental health matters that an HR manager should consider. Although mental health affects everyone, women experience more stress, anxiety, and depression at work than men do. In fact, research has found that women are 1.4 times more likely to suffer from these mental illnesses than their male colleagues.

I’d like to share with you two main reasons why women in the workplace suffer mental health issues more than men, as well as some solutions you can use to help minimize them at your workplace.

Domestic Responsibilities

When women consider the choice to start a family, enter the workforce or return to work after having children, care for elderly parents, or pursue advancement within their career, they are considering work-life balance. Although working husbands and fathers have taken on more familial responsibilities over the years, women still tend to take on the majority of these responsibilities. Juggling career pressures with family obligations can increase risks of stress, anxiety, and even depression.

So how can managers give women the support they need? Providing programs that offer greater work-life balance is the key. This balance means different things to different families, but could include encouraging flexible working hours, allowing telecommuting, and implementing child-care services. I know it may not always be possible to establish these family-friendly services, but an important thing you can do is to be more accommodating and ask the women in your organization what would be helpful to them. Making small changes to your mindset can go miles in positively impacting the wellbeing of the women in your workplace.

Inequality 

Even though we have seen quite a positive improvement in women joining the labour force, many women still experience inequality in their career. One study shows that women earn about 26% less than men do. On top of still receiving lower pay, women also face higher levels of job insecurity as well as lack of career advancement. Unsurprisingly, this causes high rates of anxiety, depression, and distress among female workers. A large part of wellness is equality, so a valuable step you can take is to ensure that your workplace enforces pay equity.

To encourage female leadership, many companies are rewarding behaviours such as nurturing and communication. When an organization develops feelings of pride, trustworthiness, and respect, as well as welcoming ideas and building good fellowship, it will encourage women to move past the glass ceiling and create a foundation that can reduce stress and mental health issues in the workplace.

Making sure your organization has the tools in place to foster understanding and equality can make all the difference to female employees.  Checking in with them to see what more your company can do to retain happy, healthy staff is vital to their overall well-being.

Are you giving the women in your workplace the support they need?