Charles Benayon

Founder & CEO of Aspiria


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Tips to Reducing Workplace Bullying

stop-bullyingOn February 22, Canadians will celebrate Pink Shirt Day, a day to raise awareness about the issue of bullying in our schools, workplaces and homes. The non-profit organization CKNW encourages people to wear pink on this day to symbolize the end of bullying. This day of recognition started in Nova Scotia after a young boy was bullied for wearing pink to school, and after seeing this, class members who opposed this kind of bullying sported pink shirts.

While events related to Pink Shirt Day are often highlighted in schools, where bullying is a major problem, workplaces are also encouraged to participate. This is due to the fact that while bullying is more common in children and young adults, it can follow us to our workplaces as well.

The Workplace Bullying Institute defines workplace bullying as repeated, health-harming mistreatment of one or more persons (the targets) by one or more perpetrators. Additionally, this abusive conduct is threatening, humiliating, or intimidating. In 2017, this kind of behaviour is not limited to face-to-face encounters. Cyber bullying can also significantly impact an employee’s mental health, and is often kept under the radar.

As an Employer:

Staff look to you to ensure they are being treated fairly and are not experiencing any kind of mistreatment. That being said, dealing with a workplace bully can be difficult. Here are my tips on how to address workplace bullying in your organization:

  1. Hold bullies accountable. If someone from your team approaches you about an issue with a co-worker or boss, make sure you speak to the person in question to get his or her side of the story. Talking to someone about their bully-like behaviour can be awkward, but you owe it to your employees who are being impacted by this person’s conduct.
  1. Have a plan in place. If someone has received a few complaints about their bully-like behaviour, it’s important to have some disciplinary measures in place to ensure bullying in any form stops immediately. After confronting a bully about their behaviour, it may be determined that this situation is a result of conflict between two co-workers, in which case mediation would be helpful. If a bully’s behaviour remains an issue, warnings may not be enough. Consult your EAP for support in this area before probation or termination results.
  1. Keep your eye out for inappropriate conduct. As a manager in the workplace, don’t just wait for someone to come to you with an issue. Make sure to be on the lookout for any kind of inappropriate behaviour in the workplace. If you notice someone is abusing an employee or co-worker in any way, make a point to sit down with him or her to discuss their behaviour. Victims will often shy away from reporting bullying incidents out of fear of repercussion to them. If you are “in the loop” on what’s going on in the office, you can save a possible victim from the embarrassment of reporting it higher in the organization.
  1. Promote awareness. Make and post anti-bullying posters, wear pink t-shirts, host lunch and learns about anti-bullying. Raising awareness about this issue can help generate productive conversations and break down the stigma of workplace bullying. 

As an Employee:

  1. Try to speak to the bully and let them know how what they are doing is affecting you. Share with them that what they are doing is not appropriate behaviour.
  1. Speak to a boss or manager about your situation. If you begin to notice that your workplace culture enables this kind of abusive attitude, speak to a manager. Employees should not be afraid to come to work, and in order for employees to work effectively, they need to feel comfortable and safe in the workplace environment. Alerting a senior staff member to the situation can allow them to take measures to prevent this from happening in the workplace.

What are you doing in your office to help recognize anti-bullying?

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Engage Your Employees This Summer and Have Some Fun

businessman-on-beachIt’s summer – the sun on your face, a balmy breeze and a cool drink are a few reasons we all love summer, but as an employer it can be difficult to keep staff engaged in their work. How can you compete with the allure of summer?

Apply the old expression “if you can’t beat them, join them”. Seize this opportunity to engage staff with your own “summer perks” plan that will make them feel more supported, appreciated, and inspired at work.

I have outlined below several ways you can help make your work environment more enjoyable and healthy for your employees during the summer months.

  1. Summer hours – consider offering summer hours for employees. Ask them to come in an hour earlier each day for 4 days and then they can leave at 1pm every Friday.
  2. Relaxed office dress codes – you may want to consider giving your staff some leeway on your dress code in the summer, including wearing golf shirts, casual sleeveless shirts, etc. The more comfortable employees feel while in the office, the more their heads will be in the game.
  3. Special Summer Events– You might want to consider hosting special events throughout the summer to celebrate your employees’ devotion while maintaining their engagement. You could offer anything from a smoothie machine once a week, to chair massages, ice cream treats, or an employee gathering outside of work hours. These efforts can go a long way toward showing your appreciation.
  4. Sponsored Events – depending on the size of your company, you could also consider arranging discounts with local businesses like sports teams or amusement parks, so your employees can enjoy some summer fun at a discount.

 
As the owner of an EAP company, I know that sunshine has positive effects on people’s sense of well-being. This can decrease possible incidents of depression, boost motivation levels, relieve tension and generally make everything seem more fun.

Have fun making your employees smile this summer!

What is your company doing to celebrate summer? Any tips on what has worked and what hasn’t worked in helping create a summer perks plan for your employees? I look forward to hearing about your perk plans and successes.