Charles Benayon

Founder & CEO of Aspiria


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The Importance of Inclusion and Diversity in the Workplace

diversity

Like you, I too was shocked to hear the news on June 12, 2016 of the worst mass shooting in U.S. history. There was no question, this was a hate crime.

Unfortunately hate crimes have woven themselves into the fabric of our culture. They’re all too common on our streets, in our workplaces and in our schools. No one is immune. Hate crimes are committed on the basis of race, ethnicity, religion, gender, sexual orientation, disability or national origin; none of them rational reasons. We can’t begin to understand a hate crime because a rational mind can’t comprehend an irrational thought process.

How can we combat hate crimes?

With over 20 years in the EAP business, I share the sentiment of Mayor Dyer when he called for the city to come together. “We need to support each other. We need to love each other. And we will not be defined by a hateful shooter,” he said.

It is so difficult, yet essential that in the face of adversity we are resilient and stay strong. To combat hate crimes, it’s imperative that we create diverse, inclusive and supportive environments in our communities, workplaces and schools. Everyone has a right to feel safe.

Five Tips for Creating a Diverse and Inclusive Workforce

  1. Identify new talent pools
  • Advertise postings in different media than where you typically post for new hires
  1. Offer diversity training
  • Lunch and Learns are a great way to educate your staff on our cultural and social differences
  1. Organize employee resource and affinity groups
  • Encourage the creation of “communities” within your organization that allows people with similar backgrounds and experiences to network, mentor, and socialize
  1. Support employee development
  • Staff of varying backgrounds, cultures, and belief systems bring a range of work styles and perspectives to the table, in turn enhancing creativity and efficiency
  1. Accommodate employee needs
  • Creating an open environment that welcomes diversity, whether it be through posters in the office to sharing company community partnership successes on social media, encourages staff to come forward with requests for accommodation

In addition to “doing the right thing”, organizations that have embraced diversity have shown gains in employee engagement, effort and retention. With workforces becoming increasingly global, accommodating our differences can create an inclusive environment that is more resilient and one where everyone can feel safe.

I leave you with these words from one of the great leaders of our time:

If we cannot now end our differences, at least we can help make the world safe for diversity.

John F. Kennedy

 

Does your organization embrace diversity and/or offer diversity training in your workplace? Does your organization practice inclusion?

 

 


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Body Language in the Workplace – Does it Really Make a Difference?

Screen Shot 2016-04-19 at 8.48.33 AM.pngSometimes, it’s what you don’t say that speaks volumes.

When it comes to communicating with employees, body language can convey both positive and negative messages, often unbeknownst to you. In your role as leader within your workplace, it is possible to create and nurture a positive work environment by being aware of simple ways your body language can be effectively used.

I would like to share with you some ways that you could start immediately in developing a workspace that encourages positivity and teamwork:

  1. Valuing Input

You may have an open-door policy in place, but when an employee comes to you to share their ideas and issues, how you position yourself when listening to them can express that their input is welcomed. When seated, ensure that your arms are at your sides or on your desk and not crossed, and facing them with maintained eye contact. It is about maintaining an “open” stance to show an open mind to hearing what they have to say. When an employee feels valued, loyalty increases.

  1. Mirroring

As employers, we want our employees to feel connected and engaged in their work. Mirroring another’s body language is a powerful way you can create a bond and show acceptance. By “copying” their posture, facial expressions, seating position, gestures, or tone of voice, you are building an unconscious rapport that makes the other person feel “liked”. The key is to not immediately do the same gesture but rather, wait a minute or two, so the movement or expression is delayed and has the intended “subconscious” effect, without mocking. Feeling a sense of belonging can elevate their motivation, and mirroring can help to create this feeling.

  1. Initial Impressions

When meeting a new employee, offering a firm handshake and a warm smile can make a great first impression. Doing so can help create a relaxed atmosphere for those who are nervous, as well as speaking at a moderate pace. Speaking at a speed that is faster than the other person can enhance a feeling of pressure, and a relaxed tone and pace can help to alleviate any tension or awkwardness and give a good impression of the company at this early stage.

  1. Pay Attention to Signs

Happy and healthy employees can reduce turnover, and so it is important for you to ensure the well-being of your staff. Although certain physical gestures and expressions can indicate underlying conditions, be aware of how employees are sitting (leaning back in their chair or slumped over), avoiding eye contact, keeping their cellphone up as a “wall” between another person during a conversation, eye-rolling, are just some possible indications of unhappiness in the workplace. It is important to be mindful of whether staff consists of millennials or baby-boomers, as generational differences may affect how their body language expresses their feelings. Being able to recognize the signs is important to ensure that the proper supports are in place, such as an EAP, to increase employee satisfaction and dedication.

By becoming aware of the ways thoughts and feelings can be non-verbally expressed, you will be able to encourage a supportive and positive work environment.

How do you use body language when communicating with employees? Are there any ways you could improve your body language? Would you be able to recognize differences in your employees’ body language?

 

 


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How to Deal with Workplace Negativity

63037.PNGWe’ve all heard the expression “If you smile, the world will smile back” – well, the opposite is also true that if you’re negative, others become negative too. In a work environment, it only takes one or two people with a negative attitude to turn what was once a positive work environment into a stressful, depressing, and unhealthy workplace.

Although there are many reasons why employees may be feeling negative, as an HR professional you can help to turn things around before that negative feeling starts to spread to even your most positive employee. Negative and toxic employees can inject their emotional venom into everything if you let them and they are often resistant to change, but you can create an environment that fosters positive attitudes, thereby providing you and your employees support in creating a healthy environment.

Here are my top 4 recommendations designed to help you deal with negativity and toxicity in your workplace:

Communicate and Understand

Communication is always key and when dealing with negative attitudes, it is essential to communicate in an open and inviting way. It may be difficult, but speaking with the person who is causing the negativity and asking them to explain the problem as he or she sees it can go a long way in putting an end to the behaviour. Restate their explanation until they believe you understand their viewpoint. Only at this time, explain your point of view.

Make it Fun

When we build opportunities for fun into the workplace, it fosters positive attitudes and builds the healthy culture we all want. Create a few regular “fun” activities for the whole team to participate in. This could include everything from catered weekly lunches, cooking contests, picture day, or outings when staff can go together to a music festival, stand-up comedy night, or a learn-to-paint night. When you create a “fun” culture, it fosters healthy relationships and builds trust among colleagues.

Neutralize The Negative Energy With Positive Energy

As difficult as it can be when dealing with a negative person, lead by example and remain positive. Encourage positivity at every level and in everything you do as a company or department. The more positive energy, the sooner it becomes part of the corporate culture, combating negative attitudes and restoring employee hope. It’s about ensuring challenges are brought up in a healthy, positive way that doesn’t point fingers but instead collaborates to find solutions and move the company forward.

Find Resolution

Not everyone will change, but you can focus on increasing your understanding of your employee’s position, share with them, and find solutions with a constructive and healthy conflict resolution approach. Look to create an environment that facilitates progress and change. You may want to speak to your EAP provider about a conflict resolution specialist or an interactive lunch and learn on the topic. Finding a resolution isn’t always easy, but it helps teams find the right answers and takes into account everyone’s perspective.

Difficult people are a fact of life, but by dealing with negative attitudes in your workplace head-on, you will encourage cooperation and communication between employees, and foster new and creative ideas for your workplace. The benefits will not only be demonstrated through lowered absenteeism, fewer accidents, and increased productivity, but in creating a healthy work environment for all.


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See The Signs – Recognizing Mental Health Issues in the Workplace

mental-healthJust a few weeks ago at a high school outside of Toronto, a fourteen-year-old girl stabbed and injured five students and two staff members. As a result, there has been more dialogue about bullying, mental illness and mental health, as we are reminded of the importance and seriousness of attending to mental illness in the workplace.

Mental illness indirectly affects all Canadians at some time through a family member, friend or colleague, according to the Canadian Mental Health Association. Stigma surrounding mental illness is widespread, often flying under the radar in the workplace because employees tend to suffer in silence – afraid to risk their careers by speaking out and employers are afraid to ask. Recognizing the signs can be crucial to preventing serious situations from developing, and ensuring supports are in place.

Being able to recognize when your employees are distressed, and addressing these concerns, can help to break down the stigma and allow for communication between you and your staff. Let me share with you some tips on recognizing the symptoms of a possible mental health issue with an employee:

  • Missed deadlines
  • Reduced productivity
  • Reduced quality of work
  • Absent or late more frequently
  • Relationship issues or conflicts with co-workers
  • Withdrawal or reduced participation
  • Anxiety, fearfulness, or loss of confidence

Each of these signs alone does not necessarily indicate the presence of an illness, but each can begin a conversation to show your employee, as their employer, that you are supportive and accommodating, especially if performance is suffering. Employees are more likely to ask for help from their employer when you provide them with a caring environment and the probability of their success will increase as well.

Social media can be helpful in providing insight, as the young woman’s blog was her cry for help in the case of the Dunbarton High School stabbing. It is crucial for an organization to be trained and able to identify the signs of an employee who may be in danger of hurting themselves and/or others due to their mental state.

Early recognition of mental health problems, consultation for your supervisors with your EAP, referring employees with the above symptoms to the EAP for assessment, treatment and support, will all help your employees receive the support they require to return to work and/or better manager their job.

The bottom line here is that when your organization creates a mentally healthy work environment for your employees, it allows them to achieve and maintain success.


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4 Reasons Why You Need A Workplace Crisis Intervention Plan

pic_rippleeffectIn light of the recent events in La Loche, Saskatchewan, we are reminded of the importance of crisis intervention when disaster strikes and the problems that can arise. It is essential that workplaces think about implementing a crisis intervention plan. Crisis intervention refers to the methods that are used to offer immediate and short-term help to individuals who experience an event that generates emotional, mental, physical and behavioural distress or problems.

Employees who are not directly involved in the event can feel the ripple effect of a workplace trauma. Ensure your plan is inclusive of all your employees as any event can severely dampen (or hamper) the productivity of the workplace. With over 25 years of crisis intervention experience, I’d like to share with you 4 key reasons why you need crisis intervention in your workplace:

  1. Decreases the intensity of individuals’ reactions to a crisis, or return to their level of functioning before the crisis.

Research has demonstrated that crisis intervention training has positive outcomes such as decreased stress and improved problem solving. Decreasing the intensity of their reactions allows individuals to be able to cope with future difficulties. It aims to help in the prevention of serious long-term problems. This will have a positive impact on workplace performance and increase work life balance for your employees.

  1. Decreases the amount of absenteeism and potential turnover.

Individuals are more open to receiving help during a crisis. Crisis intervention is conducted in a supportive manner and the intervention’s duration is dependent on the person and situation. Adults and children alike can all benefit from this type of assistance, which can take place in a wide range of settings. Implementing this help following a crisis can be of benefit by decreasing the intensity of affected employees’ reaction to the event, resulting in less sick time, leaves of absences and/or terminations.

  1. Educates and encourages employees during times of crisis.

The success of crisis intervention is dependent on affected employees learning that their reactions to the event are real and that others are going through a similar experience (ie. validation). It is the goal for employees to learn that their responses to the abrupt and irregular crisis that has just occurred are predictable, temporary and normal (ie. normalization). It is encouraging and reassuring to employees to know that their employer cares. If management is seen as supportive, employees are more likely to succeed.

  1. Allow employees to explore and develop coping strategies.

The aftermath of a crisis can induce feelings that people are unable to deal with. Crisis intervention can help with coping strategies that allow for a positive workplace. It allows for options for social support or spending time with people who provide a feeling of comfort and caring. Reviewing the changes that an individual has made and proving that it is possible to cope, are beneficial to recovery.

The problem solving process involves:

  • Understanding the problem (validation and normalization) and the desired changes
  • Considering alternatives
  • Discussing the pros and cons of alternative solutions
  • Selecting a solution and developing a plan to try it out
  • Understanding that coping with crisis is a process that can take time
  • Evaluating the outcome

Making positive and realistic plans for the future whether in employees’ personal lives or at work is crucial and employers should be providing training for management to aid employees.

Are you prepared to manage a crisis situation? How would you accommodate your employees who are suffering and raise the awareness of treatment for this?


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8 Ways to Celebrate Multiculturalism in Your Workplace

multiculturalism-worldAs the debate around racism catches traction in the news with celebrities speaking up about #OscarsSoWhite and spreading awareness of its harmful effects on a global scale, let us not forget that racism is prevalent all over our world, and has an impact closer to home and on workplace harmony.

As managers, we all know how difficult it can be to discuss racism in the workplace, but here are a few supportive ways you might consider embracing your diverse workforce by incorporating the following into your employee programs.

 Providing a workspace that openly recognizes and respects diversity creates a welcoming environment while discouraging racism and other forms of discrimination. You can engage your staff in some or all of the following ways to celebrate various cultures in your workplace:

  1. Recognize and acknowledge special culture days and events such as Black History Month in February.
  2. Have a “Win a Lunch” draw at a local restaurant for Chinese New Year.
  3. Have your EAP provide diversity training to learn about the cultural backgrounds, lives and interests of employees outside of the workplace. Building relationships through increased understanding and trust helps to promote inclusion.
  4. Hold a Lunch-and-Learn on different cultures with the ethnic cuisine of the featured culture.
  5. Include opportunities for staff to interact in settings outside of work so that employees feel more comfortable. Be creative, flexible and look for new ways of socializing and team-building.
  6. Ensure all employees have the opportunity to take part in decision-making and planning for social activities.
  7. Ensure your company’s marketing and communication collateral incorporates multi-racial images, through brochures and your website to posters around the office.
  8. Be aware of and provide time off for culturally significant events. Consider offering a float day for employees to use at their discretion to participate in such events.

Honouring others’ differences will build a better, stronger team of employees. In workplaces that take the time for celebrating various cultures, people form stronger bonds with one another, learn tolerance, and develop greater loyalty toward the company. When hiring practices focus on ensuring a diverse employee pool, you find increased levels of resourcefulness, determination, and persistence.

Taking steps to support multiculturalism in your workplace will help keep your employees feeling safe while building a positive work environment. Celebrating diversity helps in preventing the issue from becoming a major problem.


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Tips to Surviving the Holidays: Dealing with Holiday Stress in the Workplace

Holiday stress tipsThe holiday season is about “good tidings”, the pleasure of gift-giving, and spending time with loved ones. Given the stress involved for many to ensure a happy holiday, many employees are feeling the burden of managing their personal lives in addition to their job workload.

A recent study of over 700 full-time employees found that a large percentage indicated that the biggest stressor during the holidays is work, but that the stress changes. The concern becomes whether work obligations will affect their holiday celebrations and many also feel stress from not being able to take time off from their job to prepare for and enjoy the holidays.

Time and money are two other large factors in an increase in stress during this busy season. Is there enough time for shopping, party planning, and cooking, in addition to their workload? The pressure of buying gifts is also a significant stressor for those concerned about being able to pay the bills the following month.

This increased stress can lead to lowered output at work. One survey showed that over 40% of respondents in management roles reported that productivity noticeably decreases the week before the holiday. There are multiple ways you can help lower the stress during the holidays, including some of these tips:

  • Be flexible – It is likely many employees will request time off around the holidays, so if possible, allow for these days by asking staff in advance if time is needed, to allow for smooth functioning in the workplace .
  • Simplify – Minimizing the number of workplace obligations when there is an increase in external holiday get-togethers can reduce stress. A festive workplace party doesn’t have to be over-the-top to be enjoyable.
  • Emphasize value – Appreciation is particularly effective when given during this busy season to maintain performance levels at work.
  • Offer assistance – If employees are showing a lack of focus or irritability, have a chat to find ways to manage their workload.
  • Relieve deadline pressure – Hiring extra hands, even temporarily, can help to alleviate stress on your permanent staff.

Whether it’s stress from work, family or finances, aiming to improve stressful situations within the workplace can create a more relaxed atmosphere with higher levels of productivity.

What is your business doing to alleviate employee stress within the workplace this holiday season?